Six By Seven
The Way I Feel Today
Mantra
2002
B+



sometimes it must not even feel worth it. Since their debut album came out in 1998, it seems as though no one has given a shit about Nottingham’s Six By Seven. The Things We Make was a fantastic debut album, blurring the lines between indie pop and experimental guitar rock, but who bought it? The same can be said about The Closer You Get, the second album. Yeah, it sounded like they were releasing their Stooge-ish frustration out on everybody, but still, it was a great record. Now, the third record, The Way I Feel Today, comes with no hype, no word of mouth, nothing, even though it’s exactly what people should be peeing their pants about, now that “rock” has caught everyone’s attention.

The Way I Feel Today is Six By Seven’s best album...so far. They seem to better themselves each time, which is always an accomplishment, especially when the band never really sticks with one formula. What’s so funny about this record is how they can go from being screaming lunatics to little softies with the flick of a switch. Chris Olley’s vocals must be so confused. A song like “All My New Best Friends” is the perfect early morning come down ballad – sentimental, strange lyrics and Olley’s soft, reassuring voice. On the other hand, how about “I.O.U. Love”, the band’s should-have-been breakthrough pop hit, had anyone cared. Some creepy, funereal organs, a thick and chunky bass line and steady drumbeat, along with backing “oh’s” are all there. There’s even a flute of some sort. Yet, the majority of the record is what the band seems to enjoy most, which is cranking the guitars to a deafening rate.

While “So Close” may not be the chaotic Sex Pistols screamer that really catches your attention, it’s warm, beautiful and very loud, once it kicks in. Their best song to date, it really captures what Six By Seven is all about: guitars, destructive lyrics and sweet noise. Elsewhere, the overly aggressive “Flypaper for Freaks” is angry, Pistols punk full of bitter words and a title that makes no sense. “Cafeteria Rats” bleeds even more punk ‘tude, with Spacemen 3 riffs and plenty of disgust.

Some think they’re Britain’s answer to ...And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead, without the youthful disregard for their health and instruments, but Six By Seven have proven that they are in their own.



Reviewed by: Cam Lindsay
Reviewed on: 2003-09-01
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